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Coyote/Wolf Reduction Incentive Program

Posted on Monday November 06, 2017 at 03:46PM

The County of St. Paul No. 19 will be reinstating the Coyote/Wolf Reduction Incentive Program for the 2017/2018 Winter Season.

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Author: County of St. Paul

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Scientifically unsound

Hello, I recently saw the coyote/wolf reduction incentive posted. I am curious why this is still being practised. It has been scientifically proven that if the dominant male/female pair are not breeding, the rest of the pack will breed. It has the potential to increase the population.

Posted on Wednesday November 15, 2017 at 08:29PM by Ju

Are you totally crazy?

How can any community be so ecologically illiterate to sponsor this kind of action? This is nothing short of scandalous. I suggest you read "Green Fire" by Aldo Leopold. Stop this outrageous initiative!

Posted on Wednesday November 15, 2017 at 10:06PM by Mark Hathaway

Key Study: This is not effective

Yes, I agree with the comment posted by Ju. A recent study calls into question the effectiveness of these measures and also notes that the methods used to kill wolves and coyotes are not humane. See http://www.mdpi.com/2076-2615/5/4/0397/htm. The study concludes by saying: "Bounties are ineffective to control predator populations, and they employ inhumane and indiscriminate killing methods. They should be made illegal in all jurisdictions. Predator management and conservation programs should be based on real field data and developed with rigorous animal welfare standards."

Posted on Thursday November 16, 2017 at 10:38AM by Mark Hathaway

Why killing coyotes doesn’t make livestock safer

I suggest that you read the article at https://theconversation.com/why-killing-coyotes-doesnt-make-livestock-safer-75684 to understand why bounty programmes tend to be ineffective. For example, the study notes that in Idaho, "Predation [by wolves] was 3.5 times higher in zones where lethal control was used than in adjacent areas where nonlethal methods were used."

Posted on Friday November 17, 2017 at 11:22AM by Mark Hathaway

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